Kavanaugh Accuser Admits She Fabricated Allegations as a 'Ploy' for 'Attention'




A woman who made graphic allegations against Supreme Court Justice Brett Kavanaugh has admitted to investigators that she fabricated them to "get attention."

Senate Judiciary Chairman Chuck Grassley has referred Judy Munro-Leighton to the Justice Departement and FBI for investigation into potentially materially false statements and obstruction.

"The Committee is grateful to citizens who come forward with relevant information in good faith, even if they are not one hundred percent sure about what they know," Grassley wrote in his letter to FBI Director Christopher Wray and Attorney General Jeff Sessions. "But when individuals intentionally mislead the Committee, they divert Committee resources during time-sensitive investigations and materially impede our work."

On September 25, "Jane Doe" from Oceanside, California sent an anonymous letter to Senator Kamala Harris alleging that the then-nominee for Supreme Court and his friend raped her "several times each" in the back of a car. Details were sparse, such as the time frame and location of the alleged attack.

"The whole thing is ridiculous," Kavanaugh said when questioned the next day by committee investigators about the allegation. "The whole thing is just a crock, farce, wrong, didn't happen, not anything close."

Later on October 3, Judy Munro-Leighton emailed the committee claiming to be the "Jane Doe" of the letter and said she was "sharing with you the story of the night that Brett Kavanaugh and his friend sexually assaulted and raped me in his car," calling it a "vicious assault."

"I refuse to allow Donald J. Trump to use me or my story as an ugly chant at
one of his Republican rallies," Munro-Leighton wrote. "I know that Jane Doe will get no media attention, but I am deathly afraid of revealing any information about myself or my family."

Investigators located Munro-Leighton living in Kentucky, not California, and discovered that she is a left-wing activist decades older than Judge Kavanaugh.

She admitted to investigators that her story was a "tactic" and "that was just a ploy."

"No, no, no. I did that as a way to grab attention," she told investigators. "I am not Jane Doe . . . but I did read Jane Doe's letter. I read the transcript of the call to your Committee. . . . I saw it online. It was news."

"I was angry, and I sent it out," she said of her email to the committee describing the allegations.

"Oh, Lord no," she responded on whether she has ever met Kavanaugh.

Kavanaugh was confirmed as Associate Justice on the Supreme Court on October 6. During his acrimonious confirmation process, multiple women came forward with accusations of sexual assault against him. Dr. Christine Blasey Ford testified to the Judiciary Committee that Kavanaugh pinned her to a bed and attempted to rape her at a party when they were both in high school.

However, several on-the-fence senators, including Democrat Joe Manchin and Republican Susan Collins, sealed the slim majority in Kavanaugh's favor with their votes to confirm him, citing a lack of hard evidence supporting the accusations against him.

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