Kamala Harris To Decide On 2020 White House Run 'Over The Holiday'




 

Sen. Kamala Harris (D-Calif.) said Saturday she'll decide whether to launch a 2020 presidential bid as 2019 prepares to dawn.

"It will ultimately be a family decision," Harris told MSNBC "Morning Joe" host Mika Brzezinski at the "Know Your Value" conference in San Francisco. "And over the holiday, I will make that decision with my family."

Harris, 54, is biracial and made history in 2016 as the first Indian-American to serve in the Senate, as well as just its second black woman.

In her Saturday comments, she acknowledged the challenges that a campaign against President Donald Trump will entail. Trump has made deriding his opponents in starkly personal terms a hallmark of his brand of politicking

"Let's be honest. It's going to be ugly," Harris said.

Harris, who was California's attorney general before winning her Senate seat in 2016, is one of the most highly anticipated 2020 contenders. As she mulls whether to make it official, there have been unmistakable signs that she plans on entering the race.

As this year's midterm elections approached, Harris campaigned for Democratic candidates in the key early primary states of Iowa and South Carolina. She also stumped for two other nationally prominent black politicians in gubernatorial races ― Stacey Abrams in Georgia and Andrew Gillum in Florida.

In another tell, the senator sent $25,000 to the Democratic parties in all four early nominating states: Iowa, South Carolina, Nevada, and New Hampshire.

The clearest sign of her White House ambitions may be that she just happens to have a book scheduled for release in January ― about a year before, if tradition holds, the Iowa caucuses kick off the voting in the Democratic presidential race. Titled "The Truths We Hold: An American Journey," the memoir draws on her personal story fighting for social justice to offer a "master class in problem-solving, in crisis management, and leadership in challenging times," according to its publisher.

Sounds awfully like the beginning of a presidential run.

COMMENTS

More Related News

Trump vows veto as Democrats try to block emergency order
Trump vows veto as Democrats try to block emergency order

Democrats controlling the House have teed up a vote next week to block President Donald Trump from using a national emergency declaration to fund a wall along the U.S.-Mexico border, accelerating a showdown in Congress that could divide Republicans and lead to Trump's first veto. The Democrats introduced

Tucker Carlson Guest Says African Americans
Tucker Carlson Guest Says African Americans 'Need To Move On' From Slavery

A guest on Tucker Carlson's Fox News show on Thursday night said AfricanAmericans "need to move on" from slavery

Climate threat doubter is leading effort to advise Trump
Climate threat doubter is leading effort to advise Trump

The Trump administration is exploring the idea of forming a special committee to look at climate change and security risks, with the effort being coordinated by a 79-year-old physicist who rejects mainstream climate science. A memo to those federal officials asks them to direct any questions to William Happer, a member of Trump's National Security Council and a well-known critic of mainstream climate science findings.

Trump: Release of Russia probe report up to attorney general
Trump: Release of Russia probe report up to attorney general

President Donald Trump said Wednesday that the newly confirmed US attorney general should be the person who decides whether to publicly release the much-anticipated Russia report, which could be completed as early as next week. The remarks came as CNN reported that Special Counsel Robert Mueller, who has headed the probe since May 2017, could deliver his final report next week, possibly when Trump travels to Asia for his second summit with North Korean leader Kim Jong Un. Asked at the White House whether Mueller should release the text while the president is out of the country, a subdued Trump said "that will be totally up to the new attorney general," Bill Barr.

Number of hate groups hits 20-year high amid rise in white supremacy, report finds
Number of hate groups hits 20-year high amid rise in white supremacy, report finds

The nation's demographic shift has emboldened white supremacists, the Southern Poverty Law Center finds in its annual survey.

Leave a Comment

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked with *

Cancel reply

Comments

Top News: Latin America

facebook
Hit "Like"
Don't miss any important news
Thanks, you don't need to show me this anymore.