Iran's So-Called 'Stealth' Fighter Is a Paper Tiger




 

Sebastien Roblin

Security,

The one threat from Terhan we don't have to worry about.


Iran's So-Called 'Stealth' Fighter Is a Paper Tiger

One should also bear in mind that back in 2003, Iran unveiled an earlier, more convincing fake subsonic stealth fighter called the Shafaq-revealed in 2014 to be a mock-up made of wood.

There can be such a thing as posturing too hard.

(This first appeared last year.)

Iran's aviation industry has accomplishments to boast about despite operating under heavy sanctions for nearly forty years. It has managed to keep once state-of-the-art U.S.-built F-4 Phantom and F-14 Tomcat fighters in operational condition for decades, including nine years of high-intensity aerial warfare with Iraq, despite being cut off from spare parts from the United States. It has refurbished the rusting hulks of old F-5 Freedom Fighters into twin-vertical stabilizer Saeqeh fighters, reverse-engineered their J85 turbojet engines, and created a variety of viable capable drones.

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