House Democrats are so afraid Trump allies will expose the whistleblower that they might mask their voice and face when they testify




House Democrats are so afraid Trump allies will expose the whistleblower that they might mask their voice and face when they testify
House Democrats are so afraid Trump allies will expose the whistleblower that they might mask their voice and face when they testify  

Tom Williams/CQ Roll Call


  • House Democrats are considering taking unprecedented steps to protect the anonymity of a whistleblower who filed a complaint against President Donald Trump, the Washington Post reported.

  • The official is preparing to testify before Congress, and the Post reported that Democrats are weighing allowing them to testify at a remote, off-site location away from Capitol Hill.

  • They're also debating over shielding the person's face and appearance.

  • Democrats are taking these measures because they're afraid Trump's congressional allies will leak the whistleblower's identity to the public.

  • At the heart of the whistleblower's complaint is a July 25 phone call Trump had with Ukrainian President Volodymyr Zelensky, during which he repeatedly pressured Zelensky to investigate former Vice President Joe Biden and his son.

  • Visit Business Insider's homepage for more stories.

This story is breaking. Check back for updates.

House Democrats are worried that President Donald Trump's congressional allies will leak the identity of an anonymous whistleblower and are considering taking unprecedented steps to protect that person as they prepare to testify, the Washington Post reported.

In particular, Democrats are weighing letting the whistleblower testify at a remote location away from Capitol Hill. They're also debating over masking the individual's voice and face.

The revelation is indicative of the extraordinary stakes at play as lawmakers prepare to hear from the whistleblower - a CIA officer - who in their complaint accused Trump of violating federal law and using his public office for private gain.

At the heart of the controversy is a July 25 phone call Trump had with Ukrainian President Volodymyr Zelensky, during which he repeatedly pressured Zelensky to investigate former Vice President Joe Biden and his son for corruption. Biden is a 2020 Democratic frontrunner and one of Trump's chief political rivals.

Trump ordered his administration to withhold a nearly $400 million military-aid package to Ukraine days before the phone call.

While the White House's notes of the call show the US president made no direct mention of offering aid in exchange for Zelensky's assistance in probing Biden, they confirm Trump brought up how the US does "a lot for Ukraine" right before asking Zelensky to do him a "favor, though" by investigating Biden and discrediting the former special counsel Robert Mueller's Russia probe.

In addition to accusing Trump of abusing his power and violating federal law, the complaint says Trump's personal lawyer, Rudy Giuliani, is a "central figure" in Trump's effort and that Attorney General William Barr "appears to be involved as well."

Trump's handpicked spy chief testified to Congress that the complaint is "in alignment" with the memo.

The intelligence community watchdog also deemed the complaint to be "urgent" and "credible." Last week, Trump confirmed the complaint's central allegation - that he wanted a foreign government to investigate a political opponent - when he publicly called for both Ukraine and China to look into the Bidens.

Despite the public evidence supporting the whistleblower's allegations - much of which came from either Trump or the White House - the president and his allies have accused the official of committing espionage. Trump has also suggested the whistleblower and the officials they learned their information from are guilty of treason.

NOW WATCH: Violent video games are played all over the world, but mass shootings are a uniquely American problem

COMMENTS

More Related News

'Peaceful protest': Trump defends audience at his golf club who did not adhere to COVID-19 restrictions

The president's official news conferences are White House events paid for by taxpayers. They are not the same thing as his political rallies.

Jerry Falwell Jr. takes indefinite leave from Liberty University post
Jerry Falwell Jr. takes indefinite leave from Liberty University post
  • US
  • 2020-08-08 02:11:42Z

The woman was his wife' assistant, who is pregnant, he said, according a WLNI clip from the interview. The board moved on Friday to oust Falwell, issuing a statement that read: "The Executive Committee of Liberty University's Board of Trustees, acting on behalf of the full Board, met today and requested that Jerry Falwell, Jr. take an indefinite leave of absence from his roles as President and Chancellor of Liberty University, to which he has agreed, effective immediately."

CNN
CNN's Poppy Harlow Confronts Larry Kudlow With All the Times He's Been Wrong About the Coronavirus

White House economic adviser Larry Kudlow doesn't have the best track record when it comes to predictions. And CNN anchor Poppy Harlow was more than ready with the receipts when he came on her show to talk about the coronavirus fallout Friday morning. Harlow began her interview by asking Kudlow if he and President Donald Trump are "worried" about the slowdown in the recovery. "I don't know that there's a slowdown. These job numbers will go up and down," Kudlow replied. When Harlow noted that only 1.8 million jobs were added in July compared to 4.8 million in June, he said, "That is true, and it's going to be uneven as it always is." Kudlow continued to push the administration's argument...

Republicans Aid Kanye West
Republicans Aid Kanye West's Bid to Get on the 2020 Ballot

At least four people who have been active in Republican politics are linked to Kanye West's attempt to get on the presidential ballot this year. The connection raises questions about the aims of the entertainer's effort and whether it is regarded within the GOP as a spoiler campaign that could aid President Donald Trump, even as those close to West have expressed concerns about his mental health as he enters the political arena.One operative, Mark Jacoby, is an executive at a company called Let the Voters Decide, which has been collecting signatures for the West campaign in three states. Jacoby was arrested on voter fraud charges in 2008 while he was doing work for the California...

Trump says he may suspend payroll tax himself
Trump says he may suspend payroll tax himself

U.S. President Donald Trump said on Wednesday he may suspend the payroll tax himself as part of his administration's efforts to help the economy after the coronavirus shutdown, after the idea faced opposition in Congress in talks on the next relief bill. "Well I may do it myself," Trump

Leave a Comment

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked with *

Cancel reply

Comments

Top News: Latin America