Hong Kong Protesters Who Stormed Legco Seek Asylum in Taiwan, Apple Daily Says





(Bloomberg) -- Dozens of Hong Kong protesters involved in the ransacking of the city's Legislative Council this month have arrived in Taiwan to seek asylum, the Apple Daily newspaper reported.

About 30 protesters have already landed in Taiwan, while as many as 30 others -- and possibly more -- are planning to try soon, the Hong Kong newspaper said, citing unidentified people who assisted them.

The fleeing activists were part of the group that smashed into the legislature on July 1, the paper said. The people who assisted the protesters told the paper they had been in contact with Taiwan's Mainland Affairs Council, which handles the island's relations with Beijing, to seek help.

The council hasn't received any formal asylum applications from Taiwan's National Immigration Agency, its deputy minister Chiu Chui-cheng said in a text message. If Taiwan receives any applications, authorities will handle them appropriately based on existing regulations and the principle of protecting human rights, Chiu added.

Read more: Pain From Hong Kong Protests Spreads as Luxury Names Get Hit

A flight to Taiwan by Hong Kong asylum seekers would be fraught with geopolitical risk. It threatens to raise tensions between the administration of Taiwanese President Tsai Ing-Wen, a China critic who's up for re-election in January, and Chinese President Xi Jinping, who has already faced embarrassment over the global attention paid to Hong Kong's anti-government protests.

Hong Kong's historic demonstrations over legislation that would allow extraditions to the mainland for the first time have resonated widely in democratically run Taiwan, which China considers a wayward province.

Seeking Refuge

The Taiwan Association for Human Rights, a top local non-governmental organization, wouldn't comment on the case. "We cannot divulge any information regarding any individual case," said Secretary-General, Chiu E-ling. "If there are individuals who approach us for help, we'll interview these people and help them get in touch with government officials if that is what they wish."

Earlier: China Drafting Urgent Plan to Resolve Hong Kong Chaos, SCMP Says

Protesters used a metal cart as a battering ram to break their way into the legislative building on the anniversary of Hong Kong's return from British rule, spray-painting slogans on its chamber's walls and draping a Union Jack-emblazoned colonial flag across the dais.

At the time, Hong Kong's leader Carrie Lam condemned the "extreme use of violence and vandalism" and supported the police's decision to leave it undefended in the face of a small group of protesters.

Emily Leung, a spokeswoman for Lam, referred queries on the report to the Hong Kong police, who declined to comment on Friday.who didn't immediately respond to a call and an email Friday for comment.

(Updates with police comment in final paragraph.)

--With assistance from Ina Zhou, Kari Lindberg and Debby Wu.

To contact the reporters on this story: Iain Marlow in Hong Kong at imarlow1@bloomberg.net;Adela Lin in Taipei at alin95@bloomberg.net

To contact the editors responsible for this story: Brendan Scott at bscott66@bloomberg.net, Karen Leigh

For more articles like this, please visit us at bloomberg.com

©2019 Bloomberg L.P.

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