Ginsburg missing Supreme Court arguments for 1st time




  • In Business
  • 2019-01-07 15:26:20Z
  • By Associated Press
FILE - In this Nov.
FILE - In this Nov.  

WASHINGTON (AP) - Justice Ruth Bader Ginsburg is missing arguments for the first time in more than 25 years as she recuperates from cancer surgery last month, the Supreme Court said.

Ginsburg was not on the bench as the court met Monday to hear arguments. It was not clear when she would return to the court, which will hear more cases on Tuesday and Wednesday, and again next week.

Court spokeswoman Kathy Arberg said the 85-year-old justice is continuing to recuperate and work from home after doctors removed two cancerous growths from her left lung on Dec. 21.

Ginsburg was discharged from a New York hospital on Dec. 25.

Chief Justice John Roberts said in the courtroom Monday that Ginsburg would participate in deciding the argued cases "on the basis of the briefs and transcripts of oral arguments."

Ginsburg had two earlier cancer surgeries in 1999 and 2009 that did not cause her to miss court sessions. She also has broken ribs on at least two occasions.

The court said doctors found the growths on Ginsburg's lung when she was being treated for fractured ribs she suffered in a fall at her office on Nov. 7.

After past health scares, Ginsburg has come back to work relatively quickly. In 2009, she was at the court for arguments on Feb. 23, 18 days after surgery for pancreatic cancer.

Weeks after her fall in November, Ginsburg was asking questions at high court arguments, speaking at a naturalization ceremony for new citizens and being interviewed at screenings of the new movie about her, "On the Basis of Sex."

Her latest surgery was a procedure called a pulmonary lobectomy at Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center in New York. The court said in a release issued the day of the surgery that doctors found "no evidence of any remaining disease" and scans taken before the surgery showed no cancerous growths elsewhere in her body. No additional treatment is currently planned, the court said.

Appointed by President Bill Clinton in 1993, Ginsburg rebuffed suggestions from some liberals that she should step down in the first two years of President Barack Obama's second term, when Democrats controlled the Senate and would have been likely to confirm her successor.

She already has hired clerks for the term that extends into 2020, indicating she has no plans to retire.

If she did step down, President Donald Trump would have another opportunity to move a conservative court even more to the right. On the day she had surgery, Trump tweeted his wishes for Ginsburg's "full and speedy recovery!"

COMMENTS

More Related News

Brazil
Brazil's president says criminalizing homophobia could 'hurt' gays

Brasília (AFP) - Brazil's far-right President Jair Bolsonaro on Friday criticized the Supreme Court's decision to criminalize homophobia, saying it could "hurt" gays by deterring companies from hiring them. Bolsonaro, who has a history of homophobic remarks -- he once declared he would rather his son die than be gay -- also said the court was "completely wrong" because it had stepped into legislative territory. The Supreme Court on Thursday voted eight to three in favor of classifying crimes against gay and transgender people as similar to racism, until Congress passes a law specifically addressing such discrimination.

Kansas high court says education funding is adequate
Kansas high court says education funding is adequate

Kansas' highest court declared Friday that the state finally is spending enough money on its public schools under a new education funding law but refused to end a lawsuit filed nearly a decade ago because it wants to monitor future funding by the Legislature. The state Supreme Court issued a unanimous decision signing off on a law enacted in April that will boost the state's education funding by roughly $90 million a year. It was the high court's seventh ruling in less than six years in a lawsuit filed by four local school districts in 2010.

U.S. court rules against Trump administration in immigrant teen abortion case
U.S. court rules against Trump administration in immigrant teen abortion case
  • US
  • 2019-06-14 17:06:57Z

A three-judge panel of the U.S. Court of Appeals for the District of Columbia Circuit upheld a lower court decision that found the government cannot unduly burden the ability of a woman to obtain an abortion under established Supreme Court precedent. The case involves the intersection of two divisive social issues on which Republican President Donald Trump has taken a hard line: abortion and immigration.

Brazil Supreme Court criminalizes homophobia
Brazil Supreme Court criminalizes homophobia

Brasília (AFP) - Brazil's Supreme Court voted Thursday to criminalize homophobia, an important step for sexual minorities in one of the most dangerous countries for LGBT people in the world. The Supreme Federal Court (STF), which voted eight to three in favor of the measure, classified homophobia as a crime similar to racism, until Congress -- which is held by a conservative majority and is strongly influenced by evangelical churches -- passes a law specifically addressing such discrimination.

Ginsburg traveled, Gorsuch wrote, Kavanaugh coached, Thomas taught: Supreme Court justices active in 2018
Ginsburg traveled, Gorsuch wrote, Kavanaugh coached, Thomas taught: Supreme Court justices active in 2018

Financial disclosures for Supreme Court justices released Thursday showed who continues to own stocks in companies that may do business at the court.

Leave a Comment

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked with *

Cancel reply

Comments

Top News: Business

facebook
Hit "Like"
Don't miss any important news
Thanks, you don't need to show me this anymore.