Fox News Guest Goes Off The Rails: 'White Supremacists Are American Citizens'




 

A guest on Fox News defended white supremacists over undocumented immigrants on Thursday evening.

"The white supremacists are American citizens," Mark Steyn, a regular guest on the network, told Tucker Carlson. "The illegal immigrants are people who shouldn't be here."

Steyn, who Carlson introduced as an "actual thinker," was speaking about a segment on CNN in which Chris Cuomo ripped the Trump administration for making undocumented immigrants seem like "monsters" and "villains" while ignoring the threat posed by white supremacists.

"That may be well and true," Steyn said, but added that it was "irrelevant" because the white supremacists were citizens.

"The organizing principle of nation-states is that they're organized on behalf of their citizens, whether their citizens are cheerleaders or white supremacists or whatever," he said. "You're stuck with them."

Steyn also complained of "cultural transformation" in Arizona due to immigration:

Carlson called it "bewildering for the people who grew up here."

That would not include Steyn. He's from Canada.

See their full discussion below.

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