Former CIA Director Brennan Rips Trump's 'Narcissistic, Vengeful' Behavior On UN Vote




Former CIA Director Brennan Rips Trump's 'Narcissistic, Vengeful' Behavior On UN Vote
Former CIA Director Brennan Rips Trump's 'Narcissistic, Vengeful' Behavior On UN Vote  

Former CIA chief John Brennan broke Twitter silence Thursday to blast Donald Trump's threats against the United Nations over the status of Jerusalem, calling his behavior "qualities usually found in narcissistic, vengeful autocrats."

A total of 128 countries voted Thursday to back a resolution by the United Nations General Assembly calling for the U.S. to drop its provocative recognition of Jerusalem as Israel's capital. Nine countries voted against the resolution, and 35 abstained.

Before the overwhelming vote, Trump had threatened to cut off financial aid to countries that voted against the United States. Nikki Haley, the U.S. ambassador to the United Nations, issued a fiery speech to the assembly in which she vowed that the U.S. "will remember ... when we are called upon once again to make the world's largest contribution to the United Nations. And we will remember when so many countries come calling on us ... to pay even more."

Brennan blasted as "beyond outrageous" such threats by the Trump administration against nations exercising their "sovereign right" to oppose the U.S. position. Such behavior shows that "@realDonaldTrump expects blind loyalty and subservience from everyone - qualities usually found in narcissistic, vengeful autocrats," Brennan tweeted Thursday.

Brennan joined Twitter in September but posted his first two tweets Thursday, one after the other. His first tweet honored the 270 "innocent souls" lost in the PanAm bombing 29 years ago.

Brennan, who served as director of the CIA from 2013 to 2017, has been critical of Trump in the past. In November, Brennan said he believed Russian President Vladimir Putin was aware he could "play" Trump by appealing to his ego and preying on "his insecurities, which is very, very worrisome from a national security standpoint."

In September, Brennan issued a statement in support of football players criticized by Trump for taking a knee during the national anthem to protest police brutality.

"Taking a knee during the national anthem shows respect for the flag and for all those who fought and died for it and, at the same time, concern about problems within American society that need to be addressed," Brennan wrote.

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