FBI Treating Pensacola Navy Shooting as Terrorism




FBI Treating Pensacola Navy Shooting as Terrorism
FBI Treating Pensacola Navy Shooting as Terrorism  

The FBI said Sunday that it is treating the mass shooting at Naval Air Station Pensacola as an act of terrorism so it can amass more resources to investigate whether the Saudi gunman was spurred by an "ideology."

Special Agent in Charge Rachel Rojas said authorities have not yet pinpointed shooter Mohammed Alshamrani's motive for Friday's ambush, which killed three and wounded eight.

"I can tell you that we are looking very hard at uncovering his motive and I would ask for patience so we can get this right," Rojas said at an afternoon press briefing.

"As we speak, members of the FBI Joint Terrorism Task Force and Counterterrorism Division are working tirelessly to discern any possible ideology that may have been a factor in this attack."

Pensacola Air Base Shooter Screened Mass Shooting Videos at Dinner Party Before Attack: Official

Rojas said that investigators are sure there was only one gunman. But they are still trying to answer a key question: "Did he act alone or was he part of a larger network?"

Alshamrani, 21, was a second lieutenant in the Royal Saudi Air Force who was part of an aviation training program at the Navy base.

Using a legally purchased Glock 9mm handgun, he opened fire early Friday in a classroom, killing three aviation students: Airman Mohammed Sameh Hathaim, 19, Ensign Joshua Kaleb Watson, and Airman Apprentice Cameron Scott Walters, 21. Eight others, including two deputies, were wounded in a gunfight with Alshamrani, who was shot dead.

There have been reports that Alshamrani screened mass shooting videos for fellow Saudi trainees at a dinner party before the attack, that he and other students visited New York City recently, and that some of the Saudi students were videotaping as the shooting took place.

Rojas declined to comment on all those reports.

She said several Saudi students who were close to Alshamrani have been restricted to base by their commanding officer and are cooperating with investigators. No other arrests have been made.



Read more at The Daily Beast.

Get our top stories in your inbox every day. Sign up now!

Daily Beast Membership: Beast Inside goes deeper on the stories that matter to you. Learn more.

COMMENTS

More Related News

Did the Saudis Play a Role in 9/11? Here
Did the Saudis Play a Role in 9/11? Here's What We Found
  • US
  • 2020-01-24 13:22:42Z

FBI agents who secretly investigated Saudi connections to the 9/11 attacks for more than a decade after high-level officials discounted any government links found circumstantial evidence of such support but could not find a smoking gun, a joint investigation by The New York Times Magazine and ProPublica shows.One dogged FBI agent in San Diego helped drive the investigation for years, after superiors advised the team to give up on the case. Three presidential administrations have built a wall of secrecy around information about possible Saudi government ties to the attacks."Given the lapse of time, I don't know any reason why the truth should be kept from the American people,"...

FBI Restricts Evidence Collected From Carter Page Surveillance
FBI Restricts Evidence Collected From Carter Page Surveillance

(Bloomberg) -- The FBI has decided to restrict all information collected from surveillance of former Trump campaign aide Carter Page in 2016 and 2017 after serious mistakes were uncovered in court applications for the wiretaps, according to a new court filing.Two of four court applications to conduct surveillance on Page weren't valid because they didn't have sufficient evidence to establish probable cause to believe he was acting as an agent of a foreign power, U.S. District Court Judge James Boasberg wrote in an order released Thursday.The FBI acted in response to a blistering report from the Justice Department's internal watchdog that found 17 "significant errors or omissions" in its...

U.S. Justice Department says it should not have continued spying on former Trump adviser
U.S. Justice Department says it should not have continued spying on former Trump adviser
  • US
  • 2020-01-23 22:14:10Z

The U.S. Justice Department has told a court it did not have enough evidence to justify continued surveillance of one of President Donald Trump's former campaign advisers in 2017, in a sign it believes the FBI on occasion went too far when it investigated Russian influence in the 2016 election. The department's assessment, made public on Thursday, came after an in-depth review by the Justice Department's internal watchdog found the FBI manipulated evidence and otherwise overstepped its bounds as it explored possible links between the Trump campaign and Moscow in 2016. The watchdog's review, made public in December, found that FBI agents acted legally when they asked in 2016 for court...

FISA Court Confirms Two Carter Page Surveillance Applications
FISA Court Confirms Two Carter Page Surveillance Applications 'Not Valid'

A FISA Court order declassified Thursday confirmed that the government had found two of the four FISA applications authorized for the FBI to surveil 2016 Trump-campaign adviser Carter Page to be "not valid," and will further investigate the validity of the other two.The order revealed that the government found two of the surveillance application renewals to be "not valid" based on "the material misstatements and omission" used by the FBI, which was found by the Justice Department to have "insufficient predication to establish probable cause to believe that Page was acting as an agent of a foreign power."Based on the ordering of the applications, it appears the review found...

Apple Wanted the iPhone to Have End-to-End Encryption. Then the FBI Stepped In
Apple Wanted the iPhone to Have End-to-End Encryption. Then the FBI Stepped In

Law enforcement says that kind of encryption would stall investigations. iPhone owners just want protection from hackers.

Leave a Comment

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked with *

Cancel reply

Comments

Top News: Latin America