Facebook is so Dominant it Earned $5 Billion in China in 2018 - a Country Where It's Banned




 

In what can only be further evidence of the global reach of Facebook, reports show that the social media platform earned $5 billion in revenue from China. Yet Facebook has been prohibited in China since 2009.

Facebook's Fifth Largest Market, Surprisingly, is China

According to reporting by TheStreet and a research note from Pivotal, it's estimated that Facebook made anywhere between $5 billion and $7 billion from Chinese advertisers. This figure is about 10% of Facebook's 2018 revenue.

Facebook's 2018 filing confirms that revenue came from resellers "representing advertisers" based in China. Facebook apparently has an unofficial Chinese office, through its links with a Chinese company called Meet Social. Meet Social, as per other reporting, places 20,000 adverts per day on Facebook via its software platform.

The social media company, with an almost monopoly on our online friendships, has its largest market in the US. Its second largest market is Russia, followed by Turkey and Canada.

Read the full story on CCN.com.

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