Ex-board members: Ethan Crumbley should've been sent home - but Oxford H.S. ignored policy




  • In US
  • 2022-11-28 18:00:22Z
  • By Detroit Free Press

The morning Ethan Crumbley drew a picture of a gun and blood on his math homework sheet, and scrawled the words "The thoughts won't stop, help me," he should have been sent home under the Oxford school district's own threat assessment policy - only it was never used and no one was ever trained for it, two whistleblowers allege.

Instead, they say, school officials caved to the parents' demands that their son be returned to class that morning - when they had the power and authority to remove him - and bloodshed followed: The teenager shot and killed four classmates and injured seven others at Oxford High.

According to the whistleblowers, it was the second time in 24 hours that school officials mishandled Crumbley, alleging the teen also should have been sent home on the day before the shooting, when he was caught researching bullets on his cellphone in class. Under the district's policy, they say, such activity is grounds for removal.

Oxford High School shooting suspect Ethan Crumbley pleads guilty for his role in the school shooting that occurred on November 30, 2021, during a his appearance at the Oakland County Circuit Court in Pontiac on Monday, October 24, 2022.
Oxford High School shooting suspect Ethan Crumbley pleads guilty for his role in the school shooting that occurred on November 30, 2021, during a his appearance at the Oakland County Circuit Court in Pontiac on Monday, October 24, 2022.  

Whistleblowers quit Oxford school board, frustrated by district

But the policy was ignored that day, too, they allege, stressing the district has thus far tried to keep this information secret.

And they can't take it anymore.

Nearly one year after the deadly Oxford school shooting, two former school board members are speaking out about what they allege are key missteps by the district before Crumbley carried out the Nov. 30 shooting using a gun his parents bought him as an early Christmas present.

Crumbley pleaded guilty to all counts last month and faces up to life in prison, with no chance for parole.

Oxford Community Schools Board of Education President Tom Donnelly speaks during a Board of Education meeting at Oxford Middle School in Oxford on Dec.
Oxford Community Schools Board of Education President Tom Donnelly speaks during a Board of Education meeting at Oxford Middle School in Oxford on Dec.  

The whistleblowers are former school board President Tom Donnelly and Treasurer Korey Bailey - both of whom resigned two months ago out of frustration over the district's handling of the shooting investigation.

They allege the shooting was preventable had the district followed its own playbook that has not previously been divulged to the public. They maintain that Oxford school officials have led the community to believe that they did everything right and that a bad thing still happened, when the facts - they allege - show that the officials could have prevented the tragedy.

Oxford Community Schools Board of Education treasurer Korey Bailey during a Board of Education meeting at Oxford Middle School in Oxford on Dec.
Oxford Community Schools Board of Education treasurer Korey Bailey during a Board of Education meeting at Oxford Middle School in Oxford on Dec.  

Ethan Crumbley took behavioral-risk survey twice

And the district is yet to reveal other crucial details, they allege, including how it handled the results of a behavioral-risk survey that Crumbley took as a freshman, and again as a sophomore. Just months before the mass shooting, Crumbley took the so-called SAEBRS survey, which helps educators identify social-emotional and behavioral problems in students.

The district has not disclosed how those results were handled, what they showed and whether Crumbley's scores raised red flags, say the whistleblowers, who are still demanding those answers.

"This has gone on long enough. I couldn't take the Oxford stonewalling and lack of accountability any more," Bailey said in a news release Sunday. "They never thought a school shooting would happen here and they failed to take action to prevent it."

More:On a drizzly Saturday, Oxford and Uvalde survivors unite in joy

More:Judge: Prosecutors in Crumbley parent case may not use 'pathway to violence' theory

Bailey and Donnely first disclosed their allegations on Sunday in a private meeting with the victims' families before going public with them at a news conference on Monday. The district faces several lawsuits from the families.

"I'm tired of being kicked in the teeth by people who just want to know the truth," Donnelly said. "If Oxford Strong means anything, it has to be more than just enduring the pain. It has to include being able to handle the truth."

According to the whistleblowers, the Oxford school district has had a threat assessment policy on the books since 2014, only it has never been implemented.

Reflected in some of the Oxford Strong signs in business windows in downtown Oxford, marchers carry signs and chant as they march in the March For Our Lives Oxford event on Saturday, June 11.
Reflected in some of the Oxford Strong signs in business windows in downtown Oxford, marchers carry signs and chant as they march in the March For Our Lives Oxford event on Saturday, June 11.  

On its website, the school district lists a threat assessment policy that is modeled after a U.S. Secret Service and Department of Homeland Security guide for preventing school violence. Under that policy, here is what is required:

  • Employees, volunteers and other school community members must immediately report to the superintendent or principal any expression of intent to harm another person or other statements or behaviors that suggest a student may intend to commit an act of violence.

  • A threat assessment team must meet when the principal learns a student has made a threat of violence or engages in concerning communications or behaviors that suggest the likelihood of a threatening situation.

  • The threat assessment team should include the principal, school counselor, school psychologist, instructional personnel and student resource officer. It may also include others, such as a third-party mental health provider or family school liaison.

Threat assessment team was too small, whistleblowers say

According to courtroom testimony, hours before the Nov. 30 mass shooting, the threat assessment team was much smaller than what the policy called for.

Two school officials met with Ethan Crumbley after his violent drawing was discovered by a math teacher. They were Dean of Students Nicholas Ejak and school counselor Shawn Hopkins, who were temporarily put on leave following the shooting, but have since been reinstated.

According to prosecutors, the counselor and dean of students met with Crumbley and his parents to discuss the violent drawing he made just hours before the shooting. They say Crumbley convinced both school officials that the drawing was for a video game. The officials requested that Crumbley go home, but his parents refused - so the school officials allowed him to return to class.

In the end, it was the counselor and dean of students who made the call to keep him at school.

As former Superintendent Tim Thorne noted to parents in a letter: "These incidents remained at the guidance counselor level and were never elevated to the principal or assistant principal's office."

Following the shooting, Ejak and Hopkins were placed on leave and have since been reinstated.

At issue for the whistleblowers is why wasn't a bigger threat assessment team formed, as required by the district's policy.

The board members have retained attorney Bill Seikaly to represent them in their whistleblowing activities, which come one week after Oxford Superintendent Ken Weaver resigned citing health concerns.

"What they are doing is coming forward with information they were told they could not reveal to the public ," Seikaly said of the whistleblower board members. "They are coming clean."

Critics believe the reason the threat assessment team was never assembled is simple: Oxford schools never thought this could happen to them.

Tresa Baldas: tbaldas@freepress.com

This article originally appeared on Detroit Free Press: Whistleblowers: Oxford schools ignored threat policy on Ethan Crumbley

COMMENTS

More Related News

Oxford cryptocurrency case: Man jailed for stealing more than £2m
Oxford cryptocurrency case: Man jailed for stealing more than £2m
  • US
  • 2023-01-27 15:47:46Z

Police launched a five-year investigation involving more than 100 potential victims worldwide.

Leave a Comment

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked with *

Cancel reply

Comments

Top News: US