Disney+ has already attracted over 10 million subscribers




 

Disney's launch of its premium subscription streaming service Disney+ was not without issues - high demand resulted int content not being accessible for hours on its first day of availability. The company cited higher-than-expected demand as a factor, and now we have a rough estimate of the size of that demand - Disney has revealed that it signed up 10 million users since its Tuesday debut.

That's a lot of subscribers in a very short period. To put it in perspective, Netflix recently reported 158 million subscribers, but that's its total audience after many years of availability, across a broad global market. Disney+ is launching only in a few markets around the world, including the U.S. and Canada, and the Netherlands, while Netflix has grown to cover much of the world. Netflix also started out with much lower subscriber counts when it was U.S. only, with 7.38 million in 2007, the year it began offering streaming for the first time.

Disney+ has been offering customers in the U.S. the ability to pre-order their accounts since a couple of months ago, so its subscriber count represents a bit of runway and marketing effort, rather than just pent-up demand. It's also offering a year of free access to qualifying Verizon subscribers. But that's still a very impressive debut for a brand new streaming offering, and a firm basis upon which Disney can grow its audience through future releases and marketing efforts.

COMMENTS

More Related News

ETFs in Focus on Dull 2020 Subscriber Outlook for Netflix
ETFs in Focus on Dull 2020 Subscriber Outlook for Netflix

Intensifying video streaming wars lead analysts to expect dull subscriber addition for Netflix through 2020.

High-Growth Roku Will Make Excellent Takeover Target
High-Growth Roku Will Make Excellent Takeover Target

Roku (NASDAQ:ROKU) has always tried to play a neutral role among a host of empires. The streaming-stick provider sells itself as a Switzerland of streaming, offering whatever you want to watch and adding its own ad-supported streaming service free to the bundle.Source: JHVEPhoto / Shutterstock.com But as "World War Streaming" heats up, this isn't good enough for the big boys. They don't want Roku to talk, they want it to die. Before anyone thinks of bidding for the prize, they want to knock it down and see if it bounces back.So far, it has bounced back. The stock fell from nearly $170 per share to just over $100 during September, then from $148 to $120 in November. But, it opened for...

Leave a Comment

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked with *

Cancel reply

Comments

Top News: Economy