Cathie Wood: This one simple tailwind will push the bull market to 2038 - here are 3 stocks to ride it




Cathie Wood: This one simple tailwind will push the bull market to 2038 — here are 3 stocks to ride it
Cathie Wood: This one simple tailwind will push the bull market to 2038 — here are 3 stocks to ride it  

With inflation running hot, interest rates on the rise, and valuations stretched, even mainstream Wall Street strategists are predicting major corrections.

But one super investor remains bullish - Ark Invest founder Cathie Wood.

In an interview with Yahoo Finance Live last month, Wood referenced research by Fundstrat's Thomas Lee that suggests millennials could power the stock market rally until 2038.

"So this is the echo of the baby boom," she said in reference to the rapid rise of millennial investors.

The top holding of Ark's flagship ETF - ARK Innovation (ARKK) - is Tesla, a millennial favorite.

But Wood has plenty of other big bets, too.

Here's a look at ARKK's three largest holdings besides Tesla - one of them might be worth purchasing with some spare pennies.

Teladoc Health (TDOC)

Piotr Swat/Shutterstock
Piotr Swat/Shutterstock  

Teladoc Health is one of the leading telemedicine companies in the U.S. It has a consistent track record of revenue growth and margin improvement.

Not surprisingly, the company benefited from the extraordinary environment brought on by COVID-19.

When non-life-threatening, in-office medical care was put on hold during the peak of the pandemic, telehealth adoption exploded.

Teladoc's revenue increased 98% in 2020 to $1.09 billion, with total visits surging 156%.

For 2021, management is projecting a top-line of between $2.0 billion and $2.025 billion.

Teladoc is currently the second-largest holding at ARKK, accounting for 6.2% of the fund's weight. But the stock is actually down 30% year to date.

If you're on the fence about buying Teladoc while it's out of favor, some investing apps might give you a free share of Teladoc just for signing up.

Coinbase Global (COIN)

24K-Production/Shutterstock
24K-Production/Shutterstock  

If you've ever bought bitcoin from an exchange, you'll know that there's typically a transaction fee involved. And these transaction fees quickly add up.

That's how Coinbase makes its money.

As the largest cryptocurrency exchange in the U.S., it earns a transaction fee every time someone buys or sells cryptocurrency on its exchange.

In Q2, Coinbase's retail monthly transacting users grew 44% sequentially to 8.8 million. It earned $1.9 billion in transaction revenue and over $100 million in subscription and services revenue.

The company represents just over 6% of ARKK's portfolio.

Thanks to the recent Bitcoin rally, Coinbase shares currently trade at over $300 a piece.

But you can get a slice of the company by using a popular stock trading app that allows you to buy fractions of shares with as much money as you're willing to spend.

Roku (ROKU)

AhmadDanialZulhilmi/Shutterstock
AhmadDanialZulhilmi/Shutterstock  

The secular trend of on-demand video streaming has created several winners in the tech space.

Roku is one of them. Over the past five years, the stock has increased by more than 10-fold.

The company's platform gives users access to streaming services such as Youtube, Netflix, and Disney+. Roku also offers its own ad-supported channels featuring licensed third-party content.

The company added 1.5 million active accounts in Q2. Total revenue rose 81% year-over-year to $645 million.

Naturally, there are other much larger ways to play these massive streaming tailwinds.

Netflix just added 4.4 million new subscribers in Q3 while the worldwide subscriber count at Disney+ stands at a whopping 116 million.

But Wood is clearly most bullish on Roku as a "pure" way to play the trend, with the shares representing 5.8% of ARKK's weight.

The 'secret' asset of the super-rich

Luke W. Choi/Shutterstock
Luke W. Choi/Shutterstock  

A quick word of caution: Even in a bull market, most things don't go up in a straight line.

Corrections can and do happen. Even Tesla had a pullback of over 35% earlier this year.

If you want to invest in something that has little correlation with the ups and downs of the stock market, you might want to consider an overlooked asset - fine art.

Investing in fine art by the likes of Banksy and Andy Warhol used to be an option only for the ultra-rich like Wood.

After all, a half-shredded Banksy piece just fetched $25.4 million at a Sotheby's auction.

But with a new investing platform, you can invest in iconic artworks too, just like Jeff Bezos and Peggy Guggenheim.

According to the Citi Global Art Market chart, contemporary artwork has offered a return of 14% per year over the past 25 years, easily topping the 9.5% annual return from the S&P 500.

This article provides information only and should not be construed as advice. It is provided without warranty of any kind.

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