Berlin: Don't see Germany taking part in U.S. naval mission in Strait of Hormuz




FILE PHOTO: Oil tankers pass through the Strait of Hormuz
FILE PHOTO: Oil tankers pass through the Strait of Hormuz  

BERLIN (Reuters) - Chancellor Angela Merkel and the whole German government do not see Germany taking part in a U.S-led naval mission in the Strait of Hormuz at the moment, a government spokeswoman said on Monday.

"The chancellor does not see a participation in a U.S-led mission in the current situation and at the current time - everyone in the German government agrees on that," a government spokeswoman told a news conference.

The U.S. Embassy in Berlin said on Tuesday the United States had asked Germany to join France and Britain in a mission to protect shipping through the strait and "combat Iranian aggression". Germany rejected the request.


(Reporting by Michelle Martin; Editing by Tassilo Hummel)

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