As governments clash with Brussels, some cities hope to claim EU funds




  • In Business
  • 2019-12-10 15:48:12Z
  • By Reuters

WARSAW (Reuters) - Some European city mayors whose national governments are in conflict with Brussels could seek ways to access European Union funds directly, the mayor of Poland's capital Warsaw said on Tuesday.

Rafal Trzaskowski said EU funding was one area in which he and counterparts from Czech capital Prague, Slovakia's capital Bratislava and Hungarian capital Budapest would pledge to cooperate at a meeting on Monday.

"In Budapest we will sign an agreement on cooperation regarding climate change, money, and common projects," Trzaskowski told reporters.

The mayors consider themselves more pro-EU and politically liberal than their respective national governments, some of which have clashed with Brussels over EU rules and standards.

Moves by Hungary and Poland to bring their courts and media under tighter state control have led the executive European Commission to begin rule-of-law investigations that could in theory lead to a suspension of their EU voting rights.

Brussels is also considering tying adherence to the rule of law and democratic standards with access to EU budget funds -- already set to shrink when Britain leaves the 28-country bloc.

That could place cities like Warsaw, which has received some 16 billion zloty ($4.1 billion) from the current EU budget, which began in 2014 and ends next year, at risk of funding cuts.

Trzaskowski said Warsaw and other cities were hoping to secure access to EU cohesion and structural funds, which can be distributed both at national and regional level, even if the EU penalizes their national governments with funding cuts.

"I prefer to explain to our friends in the EU that it would be good for us to access EU money despite the fact that our government infringes the rule of law," he said.

Trzaskowski said Warsaw, Budapest, Prague and Bratislava could also seek to build ties with cities such as Istanbul, where authorities are in conflict with Turkey's ruling party.



(Reporting by Marcin Goclowski; Additional reporting by Gabriela Baczynska in Brussels; Editing by Joanna Plucinska and Catherine Evans)

COMMENTS

More Related News

US holds off on extra tariffs in EU Airbus dispute
US holds off on extra tariffs in EU Airbus dispute

Washington said Wednesday it would hold off on its threat to impose higher tariffs on $7.5 billion worth of EU goods in its long-running dispute over subsidies to European aircraft maker Airbus. Last year the World Trade Organization authorized the US to impose tariffs of up to 100 percent on $7.5 billion in European goods. Washington then slapped 25 percent taxes on a number of EU products including wine, cheese and olives.

Airbus shares hit by U.S. tariff measures
Airbus shares hit by U.S. tariff measures

Shares in European planemaker Airbus fell on Thursday after the U.S. government said it would maintain 15% tariffs on the company's aircraft and 25% tariffs on other European goods. Airbus shares were down 2.1% at 0705 GMT, making the stock the worst performer on France's benchmark CAC-40 index . On Wednesday, the U.S. government said it would maintain the tariffs on Airbus and other European goods despite moves by the European Union to resolve a 16-year-old dispute over aircraft subsidies.

European battery makers power up for a green recovery
European battery makers power up for a green recovery

European battery makers are gearing up to take advantage of massive "green" stimulus packages unveiled since the coronavirus pandemic though many acknowledge it will be tough to match the Asian giants that dominate the mainstream market. While Sweden's Northvolt, and more recently France's Verkor, are making a play for large-scale production, other European companies are focusing on niche markets and new technologies rather than taking on Chinese and South Korean firms with mass production of batteries destined for electric vehicles (EVs). From Greek battery maker Sunlight to start-ups like InoBat Auto in Slovakia and Switzerland's Innolith, firms say the challenge of building economies...

U.S. leaves tariffs on Airbus aircraft unchanged at 15%
U.S. leaves tariffs on Airbus aircraft unchanged at 15%

The U.S. government on Wednesday said it would maintain 15% tariffs on Airbus aircraft and 25% tariffs on other European goods, despite moves by the European Union to resolve a 16-year-old dispute over aircraft subsidies. U.S. Trade Representative Robert Lighthizer (USTR) said the EU had not taken actions necessary to come into compliance with World Trade Organization decisions, and Washington would initiate a new process to try to reach a long-term solution.

Leave a Comment

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked with *

Cancel reply

Comments

Top News: Business