AP FACT CHECK: No, Trump didn't save preexisting conditions




AP FACT CHECK: No, Trump didn\
AP FACT CHECK: No, Trump didn\'t save preexisting conditions  

WASHINGTON (AP) - President Donald Trump made a striking claim Monday, insisting it was he who ensured that people with preexisting medical problems will always be covered by health insurance.

He wasn't.

He also complained anew that Democrats didn't allow him to send lawyers to the impeachment inquiry. The opposite is true: Democrats invited him to send lawyers to the inquiry and he said no.

HEALTH CARE

TRUMP: "I was the person who saved Pre-Existing Conditions in your Healthcare, you have it now, while at the same time winning the fight to rid you of the expensive, unfair and very unpopular Individual Mandate." - tweet.

THE FACTS: People with preexisting medical problems have health insurance protections because of President Barack Obama's health care law, which Trump is trying to dismantle.

One of Trump's major alternatives to Obama's law - short-term health insurance, already in place - doesn't have to cover preexisting conditions. Another major alternative is association health plans, which are oriented to small businesses and sole proprietors and do cover preexisting conditions.

Neither of the two alternatives appears to have made much difference in the market.

Meanwhile, Trump's administration has been pressing in court for full repeal of the Obama-era law, including provisions that protect people with preexisting conditions from health insurance discrimination.

With "Obamacare" still in place, preexisting conditions continue to be covered by regular individual health insurance plans.

Insurers must take all applicants, regardless of medical history, and charge the same standard premiums to healthy people and those who are in poor health, or have a history of medical problems.

Before the Affordable Care Act, any insurer could deny coverage - or charge more - to anyone with a preexisting condition who was seeking to buy an individual policy.

___

TRUMP: "...and, if Republicans win in court and take back the House of Represenatives (sic), your healthcare, that I have now brought to the best place in many years, will become the best ever, by far. I will always protect your Pre-Existing Conditions, the Dems will not!" - tweet.

THE FACTS: Trump and other Republicans say they'll have a plan to preserve protections for people with preexisting conditions. The White House has provided no details.

___

IMPEACHMENT:

TRUMP: "'We demand fairness' shouts Pelosi and the Do Nothing Democrats, yet the Dems in the House wouldn't let us have 1 witness, no lawyers or even ask questions." - tweet.

THE FACTS: Not true. The House Judiciary Committee, which produced the articles of impeachment, invited Trump or his legal team to come. He declined.

Absent White House representation, the hearings proceeded as things in Congress routinely do: Time is split between Democratic and Republican lawmakers to ask questions and engage in the debate. Lawyers for Democrats and Republicans on the committee presented the case for and against the impeachment articles and members questioned witnesses, among them an academic called forward by Republicans.

The first round of hearings was by the Intelligence Committee and resembled the investigative phase of criminal cases, conducted without the participation of the subject of the investigation. Trump cried foul then at the lack of representation, then rejected representation when the next committee offered it.

His lawyers will participate in the Senate's impeachment trial.

___

Associated Press writers Ricardo Alonso-Zaldivar and Lisa Mascaro contributed to this report.

___

EDITOR'S NOTE - A look at the veracity of claims by political figures.

___

Find AP Fact Checks at http://apne.ws/2kbx8bd

Follow @APFactCheck on Twitter: https://twitter.com/APFactCheck

COMMENTS

More Related News

Postal Service emerges as flash point heading into election
Postal Service emerges as flash point heading into election

Cuts to overtime as record numbers of ballots are expected to pass through post offices this fall. The success of the 2020 presidential election could hinge on a most unlikely government agency: the U.S. Postal Service. The Postal Service already was facing questions over how it would handle the expected spike of mail-in ballots due to the coronavirus pandemic, but several operational changes imposed by its new leader have led to mail backlogs across the United States as rumors of additional cutbacks swirl, fueling worries about the November vote.

Coronavirus: Trump signs relief order after talks at Congress collapse
Coronavirus: Trump signs relief order after talks at Congress collapse

The measures include pay for millions of jobless but some are likely to face legal challenges.

It
It's decision time for Joe Biden. His VP pick could make history, with Harris, Rice among top contenders

Joe Biden has a crucial decision to make and the stakes are high for whichever woman he chooses as his running mate.

US response to the virus is met with incredulity abroad
US response to the virus is met with incredulity abroad
  • World
  • 2020-08-09 06:33:16Z

The United States' failure to contain the spread of the coronavirus has been met with astonishment and alarm in Europe, as the world's most powerful country edges closer to a global record of 5 million confirmed infections. Perhaps nowhere outside the U.S. is America's bungled virus response viewed with more consternation than in Italy, which was ground zero of Europe's epidemic. "Don't they care about their health?" a mask-clad Patrizia Antonini asked about people in the United States as she walked with friends along the banks of Lake Bracciano, north of Rome.

CNN
CNN's Poppy Harlow Confronts Larry Kudlow With All the Times He's Been Wrong About the Coronavirus

White House economic adviser Larry Kudlow doesn't have the best track record when it comes to predictions. And CNN anchor Poppy Harlow was more than ready with the receipts when he came on her show to talk about the coronavirus fallout Friday morning. Harlow began her interview by asking Kudlow if he and President Donald Trump are "worried" about the slowdown in the recovery. "I don't know that there's a slowdown. These job numbers will go up and down," Kudlow replied. When Harlow noted that only 1.8 million jobs were added in July compared to 4.8 million in June, he said, "That is true, and it's going to be uneven as it always is." Kudlow continued to push the administration's argument...

Leave a Comment

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked with *

Cancel reply

Comments

Top News: Latin America