Amy Schumer and Emily Ratajkowski were detained at a Capitol Hill 'No Kavanaugh' protest




 

Emily Ratajkowski and Amy Schumer were detained by police on Thursday during a demonstration against the Supreme Court nomination of Judge Brett Kavanaugh, who faces sexual assault allegations.

The two, along with celebrities, such as Lena Dunham, and public officials, including Democratic Sens. Elizabeth Warren and Kirsten Gillibrand, joined Thursday's #CancelKavanaugh protest outside the E. Barrett Prettyman Federal Courthouse in Washington, D.C., near Capitol Hill.

"Today I was arrested protesting the Supreme Court nomination of Brett Kavanaugh, a man who has been accused by multiple women of sexual assault. Men who hurt women can no longer be placed in positions of power," tweeted Ratajkowski, with a photo of her waving a protest sign that read "Respect Female Existence or Expect Our Resistance."


A video of Schumer, tweeted by journalist Benny Johnson, showed her answering "Yes" when a police officer asked whether she wanted to be arrested. In the scene, the comedian wears a green shirt and holds a "We believe Anita Hill" sign as she's herded by the officer through the crowd. USA Today reported that Schumer was held in the Hart Senate Office Building on Capitol Hill.


Another video tweeted by @Theboldtype_ shows Schumer addressing the camera: "Hi Zola, I'm here with your mom. She loves you very much. I think we're going to get arrested, and we're so proud of you."


Photos of the Schumer, Ratajkowski, and others being detained were shared on Twitter.



A representative from the United States Capitol Police, which provided security for the protest, did not return Yahoo Lifestyle's request for comment.

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