Accused U.S. mail bomber Sayoc could face life in prison with new charges




  • In US
  • 2018-11-09 18:22:23Z
  • By By Brendan Pierson

By Brendan Pierson

NEW YORK (Reuters) - New York federal prosecutors on Friday brought new charges against Cesar Sayoc, the Florida man accused of mailing bombs to prominent Democrats and other critics of U.S. President Donald Trump.

In an indictment filed in Manhattan federal court, prosecutors charged Sayoc with 30 criminal counts, including multiple counts of using a weapon of mass destruction and interstate transport of explosives.

If convicted, he faces a sentence of life in prison. He had previously faced five counts carrying a maximum prison sentence of 48 years.

Sayoc's attorney, federal defender Sarah Baumgartel, did not immediately respond to a request for comment.

Sayoc, a 56-year-old former stripper and pizza delivery driver who lived in a white van festooned with right-wing political images supporting Trump and attacking his critics, was arrested in Florida on Oct. 26 following an intense manhunt. He is being held without bail.

Friday's indictment accuses Sayoc of sending improvised explosive devices to five people in New York: former Secretary of State Hillary Clinton, whom Trump defeated in the 2016 presidential election; billionaire investor and Democratic donor George Soros; former Central Intelligence Agency directors John Brennan and James Clapper; and actor Robert De Niro.

Authorities had previously linked Sayoc to more than a dozen mail bombs around the country. Other targets included former U.S. Presidents Bill Clinton and Barack Obama, former Vice President Joe Biden, and Democratic U.S. Senators Cory Booker of New Jersey and Kamala Harris of California.

None of the devices exploded before being intercepted, and no one has been injured.

Public records showed Sayoc, a registered Republican, had been arrested numerous times over the years, including one case in which he was accused of threatening to bomb a power utility. His social media accounts are filled with anti-Democrat sentiments and racist diatribes.

In a letter to ABC News, Sayoc's mother, Madeline Sayoc, wrote that she had unsuccessfully tried to get him treatment for what she said was long-standing mental illness.


(Reporting by Brendan Pierson; Editing by Bernadette Baum and Rosalba O'Brien)

COMMENTS

More Related News

Trump vows veto as Democrats try to block emergency order
Trump vows veto as Democrats try to block emergency order

Democrats controlling the House have teed up a vote next week to block President Donald Trump from using a national emergency declaration to fund a wall along the U.S.-Mexico border, accelerating a showdown in Congress that could divide Republicans and lead to Trump's first veto. The Democrats introduced

Tucker Carlson Guest Says African Americans
Tucker Carlson Guest Says African Americans 'Need To Move On' From Slavery

A guest on Tucker Carlson's Fox News show on Thursday night said AfricanAmericans "need to move on" from slavery

Climate threat doubter is leading effort to advise Trump
Climate threat doubter is leading effort to advise Trump

The Trump administration is exploring the idea of forming a special committee to look at climate change and security risks, with the effort being coordinated by a 79-year-old physicist who rejects mainstream climate science. A memo to those federal officials asks them to direct any questions to William Happer, a member of Trump's National Security Council and a well-known critic of mainstream climate science findings.

Trump: Release of Russia probe report up to attorney general
Trump: Release of Russia probe report up to attorney general

President Donald Trump said Wednesday that the newly confirmed US attorney general should be the person who decides whether to publicly release the much-anticipated Russia report, which could be completed as early as next week. The remarks came as CNN reported that Special Counsel Robert Mueller, who has headed the probe since May 2017, could deliver his final report next week, possibly when Trump travels to Asia for his second summit with North Korean leader Kim Jong Un. Asked at the White House whether Mueller should release the text while the president is out of the country, a subdued Trump said "that will be totally up to the new attorney general," Bill Barr.

Number of hate groups hits 20-year high amid rise in white supremacy, report finds
Number of hate groups hits 20-year high amid rise in white supremacy, report finds

The nation's demographic shift has emboldened white supremacists, the Southern Poverty Law Center finds in its annual survey.

Leave a Comment

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked with *

Cancel reply

Comments

Top News: US

facebook
Hit "Like"
Don't miss any important news
Thanks, you don't need to show me this anymore.