A.J. Hinch releases statement after being suspended and fired




  • In Sports
  • 2020-01-14 00:04:49Z
  • By NBC Sports
 

Former Astros manager A.J. Hinch has issued a statement after being suspended for one year by Major League Baseball earlier today and after the Astros subsequently dismissed him. His former colleague, Jeff Luhnow, also issued a statement. They are in direct contrast to each other. Whereas Luhnow shirked responsibility and sought to blame others, Hinch simply accepted responsibility.

Hinch's statement, via Chandler Rome of the Houston Chronicle:

Indeed, Manfred's report more or less vindicated Hinch. Manfred wrote, "Hinch told my investigators that he did not support his players decoding signs using the monitor installed near the dugout and banging the trash can, and he believed that the conduct was both wrong and distracting. Hinch attempted to signal his disapproval of the scheme by physically damaging the monitor on two occasions, necessitating its replacement."

Just as importantly, however, Manfred said, "Hinch admits he did not stop it and he did not notify players or [Alex Cora, then the Astros' bench coach] that he disapproved of it, even after the Red Sox were disciplined in September 2017. Similarly, he knew of and did not stop the communication of sin information from the replay review room, although he disagreed with this practice as well and specifically voiced his concerns on at least one occasion about the use of the replay phone for this purpose."

Hinch, like many in the Astros organization, didn't always have the best response when embroiled in a scandal, but he did well with this statement in the wake of his suspension and firing, especially when compared to Luhnow's statement. One wonders if his apparent contrition might help him more easily find work in baseball when his suspension is over following the completion of the 2020 season.

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