A former Navy SEAL commander has a solution to the North Korea crisis that doesn't involve war




A former Navy SEAL commander has a solution to the North Korea crisis that doesn
A former Navy SEAL commander has a solution to the North Korea crisis that doesn't involve war  

Jocko Willink, a former Navy SEAL commander, host of the "Jocko Podcast," and the author of "Discipline Equals Freedom: Field Manual," reveals an unconventional idea to deal with North Korea's nuclear ambitions. Following is a full transcript of the video.

Jocko Willink: Hi I'm Jocko Willink. I'm retired from the military and just wrote a book called Discipline Equals Freedom Field Manual.

People ask me if I'm worried about the threat, a nuclear threat from North Korea, and I think it is something you have to be concerned about. Obviously, they have the weapons. They have the technology. It may not be perfect, but it doesn't have to be perfect for them to do some real damage. So it's something we have to be very cautious of - we have to pay attention to. And we need to be careful.

One of my most popular tweets that I have put out was, surprisingly - it was a remark that I made about someone asked me about what to do in North Korea. I replied that the thing to do would be to drop 25 million iPhones into North Korea and then give them free Wi-Fi satellite coverage. And of course, you know, some people came back and said, "Well, how would they get power for the phones?" And people broke down the strategic plan.

It wasn't meant in that way. What it was meant to say is there's people in North Korea that are living under severe repression under a brutal dictator. They starve. They don't have energy. They don't have food. They don't have progress.

It is a nightmare to live there. And the only reason that some of them continue to go on in that lifestyle is because they believe the propaganda they've been given. And I do think that if you could give them the truth about what the rest of the world was like, they would probably take care of that problem themselves.

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