A federal judge ordered Trump to turn over 8 years of his tax returns to New York prosecutors




  • In US
  • 2019-10-07 15:00:08Z
  • By Business Insider
A federal judge ordered Trump to turn over 8 years of his tax returns to New York prosecutors
A federal judge ordered Trump to turn over 8 years of his tax returns to New York prosecutors  

Reuters

  • A federal judge ordered President Donald Trump to turn over eight years of his tax returns to New York state prosecutors.

  • The Manhattan district attorney's office subpoenaed Trump's accounting firm, Mazars USA, for his personal and corporate returns going back to 2011.

  • Trump's legal team tried to block the subpoena by asserting that as a sitting president, he is immune to criminal investigation.

  • US District Court Judge Victor Marrero wrote in his ruling that the president's argument makes an "extraordinary" reach and is "repugnant to the nation's governmental structure and constitutional values."

  • Visit Business Insider's homepage for more stories.

A federal judge on Monday ordered President Donald Trump to turn over eight years of his tax returns to New York state prosecutors.

The decision came after the Manhattan district attorney's office subpoenaed Trump's accounting firm, Mazars USA, for his personal and corporate taxes going back to 2011.

Trump's legal team in turn sought to block the subpoena by arguing that a sitting president is immune from criminal investigation. The Justice Department joined Trump's team in trying to delay the subpoena.

In dismissing Trump's countersuit, US District Court Judge Victor Marrero wrote in his ruling that the president's argument makes an "extraordinary" reach and is "repugnant to the nation's governmental structure and constitutional values."

Marrero wrote that Trump's argument implies "the constitutional dimensions of the presidential shield from judicial process are virtually limitless."

Until the president leaves office, "his exemption from criminal proceedings would extend not only to matters arising from the performance of the President's duties and functions in his official capacity, but also to ones arising from his private affairs, financial transactions, and all other conduct undertaken by him as an ordinary citizen both during and before his tenure in office," the ruling said.

Trump's lawyers have said they will appeal Marrero's decision.

Read more: The 2nd Trump whistleblower is an IRS official who alleges a Treasury Department political appointee tried to interfere with Trump's tax audit

The Manhattan district attorney's subpoena was part of a broader investigation into whether the Trump Organization and Trump broke New York state laws when reimbursing Trump's former lawyer, Michael Cohen, for hush-money payments made to women who alleged affairs with Trump.

The investigation is said to have begun after federal prosecutors from the Southern District of New York formally closed their criminal probe into the payments in July.

Cohen pleaded guilty in the federal investigation to several counts of bank fraud, tax evasion, and campaign-finance violations. He is serving a three-year sentence in federal prison. CNN reported last month that state prosecutors have already interviewed Cohen as part of their investigation.

The payments being investigated were made to the adult-film actress Stormy Daniels (whose real name is Stephanie Clifford) and to the former Playboy model Karen McDougal.

Cohen admitted to facilitating both payments but said he did so at Trump's direction. In addition to implicating the president in the scheme, Cohen provided documentary evidence to investigators and lawmakers showing Trump and other senior executives were aware of the payments.

Cohen also testified to Congress earlier this year that Allen Weisselberg, the Trump Organization's longtime chief bookkeeper, witnessed Trump's direct involvement in the illegal hush-money payment to Clifford. Cohen said he and Weisselberg were both in Trump's office when Trump "directed us to go back to Weisselberg's office and figure this [the $130,000 payment to Daniels] all out."

The president was not ultimately charged, and it's unclear if he wasn't charged because of a lack of evidence, or because Justice Department guidelines that say a sitting president cannot be indicted.

NOW WATCH: Why the US border facilities are 'concentration camps,' according to historians

COMMENTS

More Related News

Senate recognizes Armenian genocide over objections of Trump and Turkish government
Senate recognizes Armenian genocide over objections of Trump and Turkish government

For decades, Turkey had deployed an army of lobbyists to stop the measure. But that effort fell short on Thursday.

Majority of Americans say Trump did not cooperate with impeachment, sought to hinder investigation, poll says
Majority of Americans say Trump did not cooperate with impeachment, sought to hinder investigation, poll says

When asked why Trump may have kept things from Congress, 35% say it was for "legitimate reasons" and 53% say it was to "hinder the investigation."

Trump to Sign Order Targeting Anti-Semitism on College Campuses
Trump to Sign Order Targeting Anti-Semitism on College Campuses

WASHINGTON -- President Donald Trump plans to sign an executive order Wednesday targeting what he sees as anti-Semitism on college campuses by threatening to withhold federal money from educational institutions that fail to combat discrimination, three administration officials said Tuesday.The order

Impeach Trump or Work With Him? Democrats Are Pushing Forward on Both
Impeach Trump or Work With Him? Democrats Are Pushing Forward on Both

WASHINGTON -- On the day that House Democrats formally accused President Donald Trump of high crimes and misdemeanors, something unusual happened in the capital: Divided government actually started to work.Within minutes of announcing Tuesday that Democrats would charge Trump with abuse of power and

Donald Trump, House Democrats strike deal on revised trade pact with Mexico, Canada
Donald Trump, House Democrats strike deal on revised trade pact with Mexico, Canada

Donald Trump and House Democrats strike deal to revise a trade pact with Canada and Mexico, giving the president a win on a legislative priority.

Leave a Comment

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked with *

Cancel reply

Comments

Top News: US