5 Of Trump's 19 Accusers Leading Call For Congress To Investigate Misconduct Claims




 

Another woman who has accused President Donald Trump of groping her is demanding a congressional investigation into the numerous sexual misconduct allegations against him.

Melinda McGillivray appeared on NBC's "Megyn Kelly Today" on Tuesday, breaking down in tears as she described her alleged interactions with Trump. She has accused Trump of grabbing her buttocks at Mar-a-Lago in 2003.

"I feel a grab on my right side so I quickly turn to look at what this is," said McGillivray, who was 23 at the time of the alleged incident. "To my surprise it's Donald. ... I'm stunned, just speechless."

"It made me feel very small, inferior," she added. "It made me feel like I was objectified. I was sick to my stomach."

McGillivray said she immediately told her companion about what had happened, and that he discouraged her from confronting Trump and alerting Mar-a-Lago staff. Instead, she said they decided to leave the event.

Now, she's joining the call for Congress to investigate the allegations from women who say Trump sexually harassed or assaulted them.

"I can't believe a guy like [Trump] could make it into the highest office and be revered as this leader," McGillivray said. "I think that we got to have higher standards in this country and we need to hold these people very accountable."

At least 19 women have accused Trump of sexual misconduct, including forcible kissing and groping, since the 1980s. Trump has denied the allegations. White House press secretary Sarah Huckabee Sanders suggested in October that all of Trump's accusers were lying.

The president tweeted Tuesday that women he "never met" were making "false" accusations against him.

Four other women accusing Trump of sexual misconduct held a press conference Monday, urging Congress to conduct an investigation into his behavior. Their stories have drawn attention recently, given the wave of sexual harassment allegations against powerful men in Hollywood, media and politics.

"If they were willing to investigate Sen. [Al] Franken, I think it's only fair that they do the same for Trump," said Rachel Crooks, who has accused Trump of forcibly kissing her when she was a receptionist at Trump Tower in the mid-2000s. "We shouldn't let politicians get away with this."

Several lawmakers, including Sens. Cory Booker (D-N.J.), Kirsten Gillibrand (D-N.Y.) and Jeff Merkley (D-Ore.), have called on Trump to leave office over the allegations.

"President Trump should resign," Gillibrand said Monday during an appearance on CNN. "These allegations are credible; they are numerous. I've heard these women's testimony, and many of them are heartbreaking."

The Democratic Women's Working Group, a coalition of nearly 60 Democratic lawmakers in the House of Representatives, on Monday sent a letter to the House Committee on Oversight and Government Reform requesting a congressional investigation into the allegations against Trump.

"We cannot ignore the multitude of women who have come forward with accusations against Mr. Trump," the lawmakers wrote.

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